*Cover picture: Miles Aldridge, Vogue Italia, marzo 2008

Vogue Italia, published by Conde Nast Italy, is in trouble or, at least, its employees are.

The labor union has announced that the employess of Conde Nast will be on strike for an indefinite number of days. What has happened in the fancy building just a few steps from the Castle of Milan, that hosts the most glamorous offices in Italy?

In July 2017, just a few months after the premature death of Ms Franca Sozzani (1950 – 2016), the iconic Editor-in-Chief of Vogue Italia, four of the Conde Nast magazines, including Vogue Uomo, Vogue Gioiello and Vogue Sposa, were shut down without notice.

While, at the beginning of  2018, three journalists of Conde Nast were fired. They were only the last ones to suffer the huge financial crisis that hit this publishing company: in the last two years almost sixty contributors left their jobs at Conde Nast.

The journalists have published a statement on the pages of Vanity Fair, one of the most popular magazines of the Conde Nast Group, through which they announced their strike and above all their solidarity to the collegues who lost their jobs:

The journalists of Condé Nast, who met in assembly, express the absolute opposition to the resolution of labor relations, declare a state of agitation and went on strike indefinitely, until the withdrawal of the three letters of dismissal and the opening of a round table with the company and all the trade union representatives.”

We do not know yet if the strike will further affect the cash flow of the Conde Nast group. What is for sure now is that the changes occured in the publishing indutry and the new media habits of both clients and the general public have not been defined yet.

The most prestigious companies in the media environment have seen (and suffered) advertisers’ changing behaviour. Bloggers are more influential than journalists, Facebook and Instagram are more relevant that any other media when it comes to penetrate a specific market.

The question is not if Vogue Italia will survive. It will for sure. The point is if it will survive as we know it now. Will it be subject to content and editorial changes  to match the interest of the new potential readers? Or to attract new ones?

In the meantime we jus need to wait to see if the huge lack in creativity, professionalism and talent that is affecting the magazines because of the several terminations occured in the past months will move the public’s attention somewhere else.